Fonduta

When Americans think fondue, they think Melting Pot or a French restaurant. In this case, fonduta is a sauce that introduces a rich, cream base along with hearty egg yolks and fresh cheese melted together for a match made in heaven.  Fonduta sauce is very popular in the Northern regions of Italy.

Asparagus is an excellent complimenting vegetable to introduce to this dish. Most Americans don’t associate asparagus as a very tasty pairing with pasta, but it’s texture and distinct flavor are a perfect combination when working with a cream-based sauce.  Choosing the perfect pasta for the job in this case has a lot to do with utility. Tagliatelle is a perfect cut whose design laps up all the sauce on the plate, leaving behind no regrets or remaining deliciousness.

 

Ingredients:

2 Large Egg Yolks

1-1/2 cups of creme-fraiche

5 oz. of fresh Parmesan cheese

1 medium grated garlic

Kosher salt

1 lb. of asparagus cut diagonally into 1/2 inch pieces

1 bag of Flora Egg Tagliatelle Homestyle Pasta

 

Directions:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.  Meanwhile, bring an inch or two of water to a boil in a small pot. Whisk together the egg yolks, crème fraîche, Parmesan, and garlic in a large heatproof bowl that will fit snugly in the pot without making contact with the boiling water.

Set the bowl in the small pot and whisk the egg mixture constantly, occasionally scraping the sides and removing the bowl from the pot every couple of minutes as you whisk to keep the cooking nice and slow (don’t let it bubble). The mixture will look thick and clumpy for a few seconds, then become liquidy, and then, once the cheese has melted, silky smooth. Cook just until the liquidy sauce has thickened slightly (it should thinly coat the back of a spoon), 6 to 8 minutes. Set the bowl aside in a warm place. Salt the large pot of boiling water generously until it tastes slightly less salty than the sea. If you’re confident that the pasta and asparagus will finish cooking at the same time, add them both to the water. If you’re a worrywart, cook the asparagus first, scoop it into a colander to drain, then cook the pasta. Cook the asparagus until it is juicy with a slight bite, 3 to 4 minutes; and cook the pasta until it is fully cooked, 3 to 4 minutes.

Drain the pasta and asparagus well in a colander, then pop them back into the now-empty pot. Pour in most of the fonduta and toss gently but well. Season to taste with salt and more fonduta, if you’d like. Transfer to bowls, top with a little more Parmesan, and eat straightaway.

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